From The Smithstonian Associates


H.L. Hunley: History, Archaeology, and Conservation of a Civil War Submarine

HALF-DAY SEMINAR: Sun., March 10, 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The H.L. Hunley was the first submarine to sink an enemy ship in combat-the Union sloop USS Housatonic. Later the same night (Feb. 17, 1864), the submarine and its 19-man crew vanished in the murky waters off Charleston, South Carolina.

Plumb the fascinating depths of the Hunley's recovery and conservation story, guided by a panel of experts directly involved in this ambitious effort.

Adventure novelist Clive Cussler's team of underwater archaeologists located the wreck of the Hunley off the coast of South Carolina in 1995. The relic rivaled Jules Verne's fictional Nautilus for ingenuity and prowess, according to some historians.

Through slide-illustrated talks, the panelists reveal the multidisciplinary efforts to excavate what was, in essence, a time capsule from 1864. They discuss conservation efforts, technology's role in textile recovery (including what is believed to be the remains of Lt. George E. Dixon's pants, with gold coin still in pocket), and forensic studies of the human remains.

Claire Peachey, conservator/ underwater archaeologist with the Underwater Archaeology team of the Naval Historical Center, moderates. The panelists are project historian Mark Ragan, senior archaeologist Maria Jacobsen, senior conservator Paul Markikian, and National Museum of Natural History textile conservator Mary Ballard. Each worked on the Hunley project at the Warren Lasch Conservation Laboratory in Charleston.

Location indicated on ticket.

H.L. Hunley: History, Archaeology, and Conservation of a Civil War Submarine

HALF-DAY SEMINAR: Sun., March 10, 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.


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